Puritan Values Ltd, The Dome, Arts and Antiques
Important Chairs and Seating

Some items here will be duplicated in New Arrivals and other pages

IPS 1
Arthur Heygate Mackmurdo (1851-1942), a very important oak chair, with an Art Nouveau floral back, 99cm high. Mackmurdo's influence in Europe is recognised as having produced the earliest examples of Art Nouveau, particularly in the styling of a chair-back designed in 1882 and the title page for Wren's City Churches a year later. The present chair was designed for the head of Rainhill hospital St Helen's south Lancashire/Merseyside (now demolished), an institute for the mentally ill, as part of an interior scheme for his study. It was almost certainly designed and made only for this interior, unlike the earlier chair which was designed in 1882 and made and sold until 1888. It was originally thought this interior was designed by the Liverpool architect Edmund Rathbone whose brother, Harold Rathbone, founded the Della Robbia Pottery factory in 1894. A picture is shown in Jeremy Cooper's Victorian and Edwardian Furniture and Interiors, p. 199, illus. 516, from the Bedford Lemere archive at the National Monuments Record, apparently credited as 'Rainhill, Edmund Rathbone'. But Edmund Rathbone was actually the Century Guild Representative in Liverpool at that time.
£POA.

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IPS 2
M H Ballie Scott. An Arts and Crafts walnut armchair with central back splat and with stylized floral carved details, the overall triangular style united by triangular stretchers.
1900
Walnut
Dimensions: H 39', W 27', D 20'.
£POA

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IPS 3
Mackay Hugh Baillie Scott (1865-1945), a set of four oak ladderback armchairs, by J. P. Whyte of Bedford, with re-rushed seats, one with metal label for the Pyghtle Works.
106cm high.
£SOLD.

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IPS 4
George Walton.
£POA

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IPS 5
A rare Glasgow School oak and leather 'Abingdon' armchair with original leather designed by George Walton. Here this design is quite radical, with large flat arms which protrude out incorporating the back legs and upright supports quite far back giving the chair a light and airy feel, the gentle tapering legs with 1/2 splayed feet gives this unique design a wonderful balanced almost feminine feel yet the continuation below the seat of the back supports giving it a subtle architectural feel and again an infusion of his own style with Mackintosh's obsession with this type of chair-back detailing. See George Walton. Designer and Architect by Karen Moon. Page 105 image attached and also see Arts and Crafts Furniture by John Andrews, Page 166.
The Abingdon chair I have for sale is now stripped of upholstery.
Circa 1900.
£SOLD.

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IPS 6
A rare Glasgow School oak and leather 'Abingdon' armchair designed by George Walton. Here again this design is very complicated and quite radical, with large flat arms which protrude out incorporating the back legs and upright supports quite far back giving the chair a light and airy feel, the gentle tapering legs with 1/2 splayed feet gives this unique design a wonderful balanced almost feminine feel yet the continuation below the seat of the back supports giving it a subtle architectural feel and again an infusion of his own style with Mackintosh's obsession with this type of chair-back detailing. See George Walton. Designer and Architect by Karen Moon. Page 105 image attached.
Circa 1900.
£SOLD.

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IPS 7
A rare and important Arts and Crafts Glasgow School oak settle designed by George Walton one of two made for one of his earliest Kodak commissions at number 59, Brompton Rd, London. The pure Glasgow design is very complicated indeed and one can see Mackintosh's influence clearly in this piece which would have rubbed off on him while working with Mackintosh for Miss Cranston's tearooms. George Eastman was not happy that Walton had been brought in to design the top Kodak showrooms but Walton had conquered Davison and Davison never had any trouble squeezing the money out of Eastman to employ Walton's expertise and by the end of 1898 they had renamed his work for the showrooms to 'Kodak-oration, the decorative work of George Walton' and at that moment the name George Walton and the Eastman company were fused as one. 1900 was the peak of Walton's work for Kodak and the Brompton Rd commission was probably the best he achieved for Kodak alongside The Strand and Brussels showrooms. He also designed showrooms in Glasgow, Milan, Vienna, Leningrad and Moscow. See George Walton. Designer and Architect by Karen Moon. Page 81 and 82 (last two images)
Height 55", Width 60 1/4", Depth 16 1/4". Circa 1900.
£SOLD.

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IPS 8
A rare Arts and Crafts Walnut high back 'Philippines chair' designed by George Walton. The back is 49" high a very elegant and such a refined chair and very good quality indeed. In the Philippine drawing room interior it is mentioned that here he is clear indications of the future and one can certainly see it in the maturity of design in this very elegant high back chair from Brasted in Kent a commission he worked on from 1902.
£POA.

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IPS 9
Mackay Hugh Baillie Scott (1865-1945), an oak back wing armchair upholstered in blue cut damask, the arm supports with chequered inlay panels, block feet. There are two armchairs identical to this one by M. H. Baillie Scott shown in 'Houses and Gardens', p. 298 and 299 in period pictures of a house Baillie Scott designed called The Garth.
Height 44". Depth 20 1/2", Width at arms 22 3/4" Height of arms 28 1/2", Height of seat 19 1/2".
£8500.

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IPS 10
WR Lethaby. A very important oak chair.
Lethaby was one of the most influential architectural historians of the nineteenth century. Working as assistant to R Norman Shaw from 1879-90, where his designs and influence was drawn greatly from the Art Workers' Guild. He published books including Architecture, Mysticism and Myth, and later in 1894 The Church of Sancta Sophia, Constantinople: a study of Byzantine Building. Common of his works are the themes of religion, myth and architecture, combined.
£POA.

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IPS 11
An important armchair designed by Frank Brangwyn. Brangwyn's last interior designs were for the Canadian Pacific Liner; 'The SS Empress of Britain', which was launched in 1931 by the Prince of Wales, later to be King Edward VIII who renounced his throne to marry Wallis Simpson in 1930. These armchairs were designed for the 1st class dining room; 'The Salle Jacque Cartier' (see last image) and they were made by H.H. Martyn and Co. Cheltenham. The 1st class dining room was described as in the Bulletin of The Decorative Arts Society 1890 - 1940 as 'In the fully fledge modern restaurant and cinema style of the 1930's. The Studio in a long article on the liner, discusses and illustrates Brangwyn's Salle Jaques Cartier:'So architectual it is, so true proportion, so devoid of Extraneous ornement. In contrast to this austerity of line, hue and colour, his great wall paintings are rich in colour; composed in the bold, yet intricate pattern of figure, fruit and flowers that characterrises Mr Brangwyn's decorative works.
£SOLD.

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IPS 12
A pair of armchairs attributed to Frank Brangwyn originally from a cruise ship or liner if not the same liner as above 'The SS Empress of Britain'. One can see that there is an intimacy between these pair of armchairs and the armchair above, and they also have a central under bar under the drop in seats identical to the above chair which would have had a bolt and eye as above in images 12 and 13 to secure the chain that would prevent the chairs from sliding in stormy weather and one retains it's ivorene numbered disc number 74, they also have the remains of what would have been rubberoid feet screwed to the bottom of each leg again to help them from sliding in heavy weather. These chairs share stylistic qualities with the famous armchair above. He also designed two private dining areas, the Salle Wolfe and Salle Montcalm. These chairs retain the stay bars for securing them during heavy weather.
£POA.

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IPS 13
Charles Robert Ashbee (1863-1942) for the Guild of Handicraft, a beech ladderback armchair, with a re-rushed seat, 119cm high; and a single chair en suite. Designed for the dining room of the 'Magpie and Stump', Cheyne Walk, Chelsea, his family home from 1896. One can see the taller ladderback at the head of the table in a watercolour showing the dining room of his house. See Cooper, Jeremy 'Victorian and Edwardian Furniture and Interiors' London 1987, p. 200, illus. 522; Whiteway, Michael and Gere, Charlotte 'Nineteenth-Century Design' London 1993, p. 253, plate 319; and Andrews, John 'Arts and Crafts Furniture' Antique Collectors Club, p. 88, pl. 85.
£POA.

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IPS 14
Joseph Hoffmann (1870-1956) designed for the 5th Secession Exhibition in 1899, an exceptional oak corner armchair. Octagonal arm supports, and following through to the egs. An identical chair was exhibited at the Tate, Liverpool, at the 'Gustav Klimt: Painting, Design, and Modern Life in Vienna 1900' exhibition, 30th May to 31st August 2008.
H 30'x W 25'x D 17'
c.1899
£POA.

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IPS 15
A Gothic Revival painted, carved and pierced oak side chair, possibly designed by William Burgess, with animal forms of an elephant and a mythical bird to the upright terminals, leather seat.
Height 106cm .
£SOLD.

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IPS 20
A Gothic Revival chair designed by Bruce Talbert carved finials and stylised carved floral detail to the head rail flanked by carved rosettes and through pegged construction to the upper sides and superb a padded back and further carved details below to each lower corner with wonderful cloud shaped undertiers with circular through details and carved supports to the upper front legs with conforming circular through details and very stylish brass and ceramic castors with a superb kick out detail to the rear legs. Last two images of a very similar chair in Jeremy Coopers Victorian and Edwardian Furniture and Interiors Page 111 and page 85. Probably designed before Talbert published his book Gothic Forms applied to Furniture, Metalwork and Decoration For Domestic Purposes which was published in 1868.
£SOLD

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IPS 21
The Butterfly chair designed by E.A.Taylor and made by Wylie and Lochhead for the 1901 Pavilion Exhibition. An important documented work of Art with Mother of Pearl and Walnut inlaid Butterflies and stylised flower heads.
£SOLD

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IPS 22
Tutankhamun. An extremely rare pair of stunning 1920's Egyptian revival armchairs, a copy of the most spectacular of all the six chairs found in Tutankhamun's tomb. The original when found by Howard Carter was wrapped with sheets of gold and silver and then inlaid with an array of semi-precious stones, faience and coloured glass, which together were worked into a wealth of symbolic and decorative elements. Finely detailed lion's legs support the chair, while the arm panels take the form of winged uraei (or cobras) surmounted by the double crown of Upper and Lower Egypt. Partially visible is the exquisitely rendered chair back, which depicts Queen Ankhesenamun anointing her husband beneath the life-giving rays of the sun disc.
Circa late 1920's.
£5,500 each.

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IPS 23
An Egyptian Revival garden bench with Sphinx heads to the top and Sphinx wings and legs to the front and a pair of dragon like eagles face to face seperated by a Lotus Flower with a scroll style lower stretcher joining the legs.
Circa 1880.
£POA.

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IPS 24
Phillip Webb for Morris and Co. Two important adjustable ebonised armchair's designed in 1866 with arched arms and legs united by bobbin turnings with adjustable back and bobbin turned stretchers on brass and ceramic castors. Upholstered in original Morris and Co double woven Bird fabric. These elegant timeless recliners were based on a design from an earlier traditional prototype found in the workshop of an old carpenter named Ephraim Colman in Herstmonceux, E. Sussex, in 1866 by George Warrington Taylor who was the business manager for Morris Marshall and Faulkner. He drew a sketch and wrote a description of the chair and sent it to Philip Webb who adapted it for production by Morris, Marshall and Faulkner 1861-1875. (The firm became Morris and Co in 1875). So rare to find one, a dream to find two. An icon of the 20th Century.
Circa 1866.
£SOLD.

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IPS 25
A rare pair of 'Morris' oak reclining armchairs after a design by Phillip Webb and made by Jas Shoolbred. These armchairs are very close to the original design by Phillip Webb and superb quality pair typical of all Shoolbreds work, certainly one of the best makers in London in the late Victorian and Edwardian periods, they had workshops at Tottenham Court Rd, in London.
Circa 1890.
£POA.

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IPS 26
Philip Webb (attributed) for Morris and Co., an Aesthetic Movement mahogany sofa, upholstered in ‘Bird’ fabric designed by William Morris. Exhibited at the Liberty and Co. Exhibition, June 2009, no. f13
Height 42" 107cm, Width 73" 185.5, Depth 26 1/2" 66cm.
Circa 1866-70's.
SOLD to English Heritage.

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IPS 27
A pair of quality Mahogany armchairs attributed to George Jack for Morris and Co with fabulous inlaid details through out, the style and quality of these armchairs are of a more traditional influence with an artistic feel which was used extensively by George Jack. His own work for Morris and Co is very much in the Sheraton Revivalist style.
Circa 1900.
£POA.

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IPS 28
A rare and important Arts and Crafts oak armchair and matching side chair designed by George Montague Ellwood and made by J S Henry. These chairs were exhibited at The Dublin Museum Exhibition held in 1905. Last 2 images from British Furniture by Pauline Aguis.
Circa 1905.
£SOLD.

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IPS 29
G.M.Ellwood and made by JS Henry.
A rare Satin Birch Arts and Crafts armchair with Pewter and Brass stylised floral inlay's to the top, tapering back with original fabric to the seat and the back with shaped arms united to tapering front legs with extended capped tops and kick out details to the lower back legs.
Circa 1900.
£POA.

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IPS 31
Set of fourteen Mahogany Arts and Crafts dining chairs designed in the offices of Richard Norman Shaw and possibly designed by W. R. Lethaby, retailed by Morris and Co.
Circa 1900.
£POA.

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IPS 32
A rare Glasgow School Art Nouveau armchair with a Mother of Pearl inlaid bird to the top rail and a fabulous back panel depicting an Art Nouveau maiden holding a bird and further inlaid Mother of Pearl birds to the front of the seat, this is a wonderful designed chair also with beautifully shaped front legs and generous curving arms and curved side stretchers.
Circa 1900.
£SOLD

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IPS 33
H W Batley. Attributed. Made by Collinson and Lock. a Rosewood part drawing room suite, comprising four side chairs, a high-back nursing chair and a low-back nursing chair, with ring-turned galleries, uprights and supports, original Paisley pattern silk brocade upholstery identical to those illustrated in the 1871 catalogue. The illustrations were drawn by Moyr Smith. See 19th Century Design by Michael Whiteway PAGE 283. For a similar example see Christies 9th November 2000, sale number 6394 Lot 16 which made £3055.
Circa 1871.
£POA.

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IPS 34
Attributed to Moyar Smith and made by Collinson and Lock. Chaise Lounge with triangular 'A' frame to one end, ebonised tramlines throughout with a lower turned gallery and turned feet. The semi upholstered back with open turned gallery and incised zig-zag and dot details. These details point towards the Dr Christopher Dresser studio's where Moyar Smith designed with Dresser, and this chaise is illustrated in the Collinson and Lock catalogue 1871 which Smith drew all the illustrations. The incised zig-zag and dot details are not Collcutt's hand and being so particular make it almost certain that Moyar Smith indeed designed this. Michael Whiteway notes that Collcutt designed nearly all of the furniture in the Collinson and Lock catalogue of 1871 and Moyar Smith drew all the illustrations and may have contributed some of the designs. See 19th Century Design by Michael Whiteway PAGE 283 HEADING :- THOMAS EDWARD COLLCUTT 1840 - 1924.
Height 36" 78cm, Length 68" 170cm, Depth 22" 70cm. Circa 1871.
£POA.

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IPS 35
A fine quality Anglo-Japanese settee possibly designed by E.W.Godwin with subtle Japanesque detailing to the back uprights, each arm that turn out in the Japanese style with finely carved foliate details to the upper fronts and fine turnings to the lower back and below the arms, on finely turned legs with high quality treble ribbed brass and ceramic castors.
Circa 1870's.
£POA.

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IPS 37
A fine quality Oak Arts and Crafts armchair designed by Walter Cave with capped tops, a heart cut out to the shaped back splat which follows a little of the shape of the serpentine back legs which curve four opposite ways as they follow down an incredible detail with wonderful shaped arms and mitred joints as they meet the back uprights. A real hybrid in design and quality.
Circa 1900.
£SOLD.

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IPS 38
A Gothic Revival oak armchair designed by John Pollard Seddon and made by his family firm Thomas Seddon (Seddon and Co) who were in Bond Street and supplied furniture to Windsor castle and Buckingham Palace, founded by his Great Grandfather George Seddon. He exhibited an almost identical armchair on the Morris, Marshall, Faulkner and Co stand at the 1862 International Exhibition, illustrated in JEREMY COOPERS Victorian and Edwardian Furniture and Interiors, page 104 illustration 220 (the original drawing) and 227 (a variation of this chair) and another version is also illustrated in Nineteenth Century Design by Charlotte Gere and Michael Whiteway, page 84 illustration pl 83 (last two images).
Circa 1860's.
£POA

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IPS 39
An important oak Gothic armchair designed by John Pollard Seddon and made by his family firm Thomas Seddon (Seddon and Co) who were in Bond Street and supplied furniture to Windsor castle and Buckingham Palace, founded by his Great Grandfather George Seddon. He exhibited an almost identical armchair on the Morris, Marshall, Faulkner and Co stand at the 1862 International Exhibition, illustrated in JEREMY COOPERS Victorian and Edwardian Furniture and Interiors, page 104 illustration 220 (the original drawing) and 227 (a variation of this chair) and another version is also illustrated in Nineteenth Century Design by Charlotte Gere and Michael Whiteway, page 84 illustration pl 83 (last 2 images).
Seddon's partner at one point was E.W.Godwin a friend of the Pre-Raphaelites and some of his pupils were Ford Maddox Brown, C.F.A.Voysey and Daniel Gabriel Rossetti.
Circa 1860's.
£SOLD.

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IPS 40
A pair of important oak Gothic chairs designed by John Pollard Seddon and made by his family firm Thomas Seddon (Seddon and Co) who were in Bond Street and supplied furniture to Windsor castle and Buckingham Palace, founded by his Great Grandfather George Seddon. He exhibited an almost identical armchair on the Morris, Marshall, Faulkner and Co stand at the 1862 International Exhibition, illustrated in JEREMY COOPERS Victorian and Edwardian Furniture and Interiors, page 104 illustration 220 (the original drawing) and 227 (a variation of this chair) and another version is also illustrated in Nineteenth Century Design by Charlotte Gere and Michael Whiteway, page 84 illustration pl 83 (last 2 images). Circa 1860's.
£POA.

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IPS 45
Another almost identical pair of oak Gothic chairs designed by John Pollard Seddon and made by his family firm Thomas Seddon (Seddon and Co) who were in Bond Street and supplied furniture to Windsor castle and Buckingham Palace, founded by his Great Grandfather George Seddon. He exhibited an almost identical armchair on the Morris, Marshall, Faulkner and Co stand at the 1862 International Exhibition, illustrated in JEREMY COOPERS Victorian and Edwardian Furniture and Interiors, page 104 illustration 220 (the original drawing) and 227 (a variation of this chair) and another version is also illustrated in Nineteenth Century Design by Charlotte Gere and Michael Whiteway, page 84 illustration pl 83 (last two images). Circa 1860's.
£POA.

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IPS 46
A rare Gothic Revival chair designed by John Pollard Seddon and made by Gillows of Lancaster, with pyramid tops and arched and turned back with inlaid dot decoration and through pegged construction, turned stretchers and front legs with brass and ceramic castors and wonderful kick out back legs.
Circa 1870.
£POA.
This chair shows many design details to the chair he designed for the 1862 International Exhibition especially (in the above five chairs) and the only other furniture company he is known to have designed for is Gillows.

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IPS - B
An Arts and Crafts armchair attributed to E.Punnet and made by William Birch with Mother of Pearl and Ebony stylised floral inlay. An identical version is illustrated in 'The Birch Design Ledger, illustration number and there is another example in the collection at The Glasgow School of Art (GSA).
1901.
£SOLD.

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IPS - C
An Arts and Crafts oak settle designed by Edgar Wood of superior quality and design. A precision engineered architectural work of Art with 3 protruding through tenons to each side joining the seat to the impressive sensual organic elongated bird like details to the sides.
last image to the right taken from the "Special Summer Number of the Studio" "Modern, Domestic Architecture and Decoration 1901.
Length 6', Height 68", Depth 18".
£SOLD.

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IPS - D
An important pair of Anglo-Japanese stools designed by Thomas Jeckyll and made by Gillows of Lancaster, each stamped Gillow 11439 and 11440, one signed in pencil and dated 1875.
See Christies South Kensington, Ken Hill, Snettisham, Norfolk, 13th September 1999, Lot 632. Note: These stools formed part of a group of furniture designed by Thomas Jeckyll for the industrialist Edward Green and his wife Mary for their home The Old Hall, Heath, Yorkshire in the 1870s. The furniture was removed to Ken Hill when the Greens moved there in 1890.
The signature of F. Branscombe is thought to be that of the upholsterer.
Circa 1875.
£SOLD.

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IPS - E
George Washington Jack for Morris and Co., a mahogany 'Saville' armchair, circa 1890, with wavy square arm spindles, on swollen front legs with later conforming casters, with original cotton mohair damask Crown Imperial pattern upholstery designed by William Morris and registered on 18th November 1876, 93cm high (the casters now replaced) See Parry, Linda 'William Morris' Exhibition catalogue:VandA 1996, p. 178-179, no. J.32 for a 'Saville' armchair in the Victoria and Albert Museum. Also see Parry, Linda 'William Morris Textiles', p. 150, fig. 22 for this upholstery. It is extremely rare to find Morris furniture still with the original fabric it started life with and, although slightly worn to the arms, the fabric is in reasonable condition throughout. A good museum example of an original Saville armchair with its original coat.
Circa 1900.
£SOLD.

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IPS - F
Morris and Co., a Mahogany armchair designed by George Jack.
Height 94cm. Circa 1890.
£SOLD.

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IPS - G
George Washington Jack for Morris and Co., a mahogany ‘Saville’ armchair, with wavy square arms spindles, on swollen front legs with later conforming casters,
Height 93cm Circa 1890.
£SOLD.

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IPS - H
A rare pair of Gothic Revival dining chairs by J.G.Crace probably designed for Abney Hall (last image see Jeremy Coopers Victorian and Edwardian Furniture and Interiors page 53 Illustration 114). The head rails with solid Ebony carved florets the outer ones differing to the central one and double chamfered details which are used at all the back rest joints and at every corner below the seats with a double detail to the ends beneath each side seat rail and to the squares at the lower front legs a particular detail that has an attractive and functional purpose with wonderfully chamfered birds beak end details that stop and start on the classic H stretcher where they meet leaving a slightly chunkier part of the oak again for better strength of the joints and continuing to the back legs where they meet with a superb kick out detail. Retaining their original finish.
Circa 1857.
£SOLD.

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IPS - I
A rare oak Arts and Crafts armchair with wonderful Ebony and Walnut inlay of a stylised Tulip. Designed by E.G.Punnet and made by William Birch for Liberty and Co.
Circa 1895.
£SOLD.

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IPS - J
A superb quality 'Morris' Walnut armchair after a design by Phillip Webb with arched arms and legs united by refined turnings with adjustable back and incised turned stretchers on brass and ceramic castors re-upholstered in a contemporary Morris and Co Vine fabric by Sanderson's.
Circa 1890.
£SOLD.

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IPS - K
A good pair of Arts and Crafts chairs attributed to George Walton (see Victorian and Edwardian Furniture and Interiors by Jeremy Cooper page 233) with stylied fruitwood inlays in discs which have 3 elongated back splats in pyramid form, small upholstered panels to each top corner and square tapering legs.
Circa 1900.
£SOLD.

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IPS - L
Morris and Co., A Saville three piece suite, consisting of a Mahogany two seater settee, Ladies armchair and a Gentleman's armchair identical to the ladies version except with elongated arms. Superior quality made by Morris and Co and designed by George Jack. Made by Morris and Co.
Settee Width 124cm, Ladies armchair 83cm. Gentlemans armchair 91cm. Circa 1890.
£SOLD.

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IPS - M
A rare set of ten oak Arts and Crafts Regal dining chair's designed by GM Ellwood and made by JS Henry.
Circa 1905.
£SOLD.

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